1. It is well established that Florida physicians are required to report any adverse incident that occurs in their office to the Department of Health. Discovery of these reports is a patient’s constitutional right under Article X, section 25 of the Florida Constitution (Amendment 7). Now, it also appears that adverse incident reports to any Patient Safety Organization (PSO) under the federal Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (PSQIA) are most likely discoverable following a recent Florida Supreme Court decision.
Continue Reading Florida Supreme Court Rulings Affecting Health Care Providers

Hospitals are commonly named as defendants in medical malpractice lawsuits for claims arising from alleged injuries within their walls, but what is their exposure to liability for claims that arise from alleged sexual assaults by staff on their premises? In September 2016, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution released a five-part investigative series examining the alleged epidemic of physician sex abuse in all 50 states. The series examined the purported problem of sexual abuse by physicians, including how licensing bodies discipline physicians, how cases of sex abuse are handled in each state, the ability of physicians to continue to practice despite allegations of abuse, and the effects of such abuse on the victims.
Continue Reading Claims of Negligent Hiring, Supervision or Retention Draw Hospitals into Abuse Cases

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), a/k/a Obamacare, was drafted to make health care and health insurance more affordable and more available to more Americans as well as to relieve some of the burden on Medicaid. However, the ACA also may have an impact on personal injury litigation. In particular, this legislation may serve to reduce awards for the cost of future medical care, while preventing plaintiffs from obtaining a double recovery as they do often today, consisting of an award of the predicted costs of future care and the benefits of ongoing health insurance that is often available for that care.
Continue Reading Obamacare in the Courtroom: In the Matter of Double Recovery

151002-Professional-Liability-BlogImagev3Quasi Tort Reform in Nursing Home Litigation Is on the Way!

Last fall, I posted a blog about the national trend of including arbitration provisions in nursing home admission agreements. This trend peaked following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Marmet Health Care Center v. Brown, 132 S.Ct. 1201 (2012), in which the Court determined that the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) preempts any state law or public policy limiting arbitration, holding that the language in the Act did not limit its application to non–personal injury disputes. The only remaining issue is whether contracts requiring arbitration, like any other contracts, are procedurally and substantively enforceable under New York contract laws. Continue Reading Arbitration of Nursing Home Suits: Take Two