Professional Liability

I vividly recall attending the Bronx Bar Association Dinner last fall when it was announced that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) would ban pre-dispute arbitration provisions in nursing home admission agreements as of November 28, 2016. This news was relayed to me by a Bronx Supreme Court judge who had denied my very first motion to compel arbitration under such a provision. That denial ultimately was reversed on appeal.
Continue Reading Ding Dong the Arbitration Ban Is Dead!

1. It is well established that Florida physicians are required to report any adverse incident that occurs in their office to the Department of Health. Discovery of these reports is a patient’s constitutional right under Article X, section 25 of the Florida Constitution (Amendment 7). Now, it also appears that adverse incident reports to any Patient Safety Organization (PSO) under the federal Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (PSQIA) are most likely discoverable following a recent Florida Supreme Court decision.
Continue Reading Florida Supreme Court Rulings Affecting Health Care Providers

Attorneys are accustomed to being called “ambulance chasers” or “sharks,” always interested in increasing their fees. Even if a lawyer reduces a bill for an unhappy client, that conduct may backfire if the client isn’t satisfied with the reduction. The attorney cannot later renege on the gratuitous fee discount or reduction, no matter what the reason. In a March 3, 2017, ruling, the Massachusetts Appeals Court − the commonwealth’s intermediate appellate court − held that a voluntary “professional courtesy credit” issued unconditionally to a client cannot be rescinded by a law firm when the client fails to timely pay its reduced bill. It just wouldn’t be “fair.”
Continue Reading Nice Attorneys Sometimes Finish Last

Hospitals are commonly named as defendants in medical malpractice lawsuits for claims arising from alleged injuries within their walls, but what is their exposure to liability for claims that arise from alleged sexual assaults by staff on their premises? In September 2016, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution released a five-part investigative series examining the alleged epidemic of physician sex abuse in all 50 states. The series examined the purported problem of sexual abuse by physicians, including how licensing bodies discipline physicians, how cases of sex abuse are handled in each state, the ability of physicians to continue to practice despite allegations of abuse, and the effects of such abuse on the victims.
Continue Reading Claims of Negligent Hiring, Supervision or Retention Draw Hospitals into Abuse Cases

Business people shaking hands

If you are selling or acquiring an accounting practice, you need to read the AICPA’s new guidance “Transfer of Files and Return of Client Records in Sale, Transfer, Discontinuance or Acquisition of a Practice,” which clarifies the obligations of the selling and the acquiring parties and explains how to deal with clients that do not respond to the notification of the transaction.
Continue Reading Accountants M&A Alert: New AICPA Guidance on Transfer of Client Files