I vividly recall attending the Bronx Bar Association Dinner last fall when it was announced that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) would ban pre-dispute arbitration provisions in nursing home admission agreements as of November 28, 2016. This news was relayed to me by a Bronx Supreme Court judge who had denied my very first motion to compel arbitration under such a provision. That denial ultimately was reversed on appeal.
Continue Reading Ding Dong the Arbitration Ban Is Dead!

1. It is well established that Florida physicians are required to report any adverse incident that occurs in their office to the Department of Health. Discovery of these reports is a patient’s constitutional right under Article X, section 25 of the Florida Constitution (Amendment 7). Now, it also appears that adverse incident reports to any Patient Safety Organization (PSO) under the federal Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (PSQIA) are most likely discoverable following a recent Florida Supreme Court decision.
Continue Reading Florida Supreme Court Rulings Affecting Health Care Providers

A cropped shot of an elderly woman sitting at a table and signing a document

As anticipated, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has released new regulations addressing the use of arbitration agreements in nursing home admission agreements applicable to facilities that participate in Medicaid and Medicare programs. However, the scope has far exceeded what was expected. The proposed regulations only sought to ban mandatory arbitration agreements as a condition of admission. The actual regulations prohibit “pre-dispute” arbitration agreements instead.
Continue Reading Is This the End of Arbitration in Nursing Home Litigation?

151002-Professional-Liability-BlogImagev3Quasi Tort Reform in Nursing Home Litigation Is on the Way!

Last fall, I posted a blog about the national trend of including arbitration provisions in nursing home admission agreements. This trend peaked following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Marmet Health Care Center v. Brown, 132 S.Ct. 1201 (2012), in which the Court determined that the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) preempts any state law or public policy limiting arbitration, holding that the language in the Act did not limit its application to non–personal injury disputes. The only remaining issue is whether contracts requiring arbitration, like any other contracts, are procedurally and substantively enforceable under New York contract laws. Continue Reading Arbitration of Nursing Home Suits: Take Two