Photo of Steven L. Young

Steve Young is a versatile attorney who has adapted his practice throughout his career to meet clients’ needs in the ever-changing field of liability insurance. Steve’s broad experience in the insurance arena provides him with the insight necessary to handle all types of claims based on various types of policies.

The past several years have seen a slew of high-profile excessive force cases against law enforcement officers, often highlighted by cell phone video. These cases have placed increasing pressure on local police departments, which continue to struggle with balancing the public interest in community safety against the individual rights of suspects on the street. At the highest level of the legal landscape, however, the United States Supreme Court recently issued a decision that arguably expands the qualified immunity defense, at least in certain kinds of deadly force cases.

Continue Reading Qualified Immunity and Deadly Car Chases: Is the Pendulum Heading the Other Way?

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The year was 1979 when Bob Dylan’s song “Gotta Serve Somebody” was released on his album Slow Train Coming: “It may be the devil or it may be the Lord, but you’re gonna have to serve somebody.”

While Dylan’s theme of determining who you serve was unrelated to insurance brokers, the New York Court of Appeals recently clarified and distinguished its own 1979 opinion in Mighty Midgets v. Centennial Ins. Co., 47 N.Y.2d 12, which held that notice of a claim provided to an insurance broker could be sufficient to notify an insurer of a claim. The insured in Mighty Midgets, a non-profit youth football organization led by a young volunteer president, was told by its broker not to report the injury to the league’s liability insurer because the family of an injured minor was only looking for medical expense payments. When a lawsuit was served, the insurer denied coverage. The Court held under the circumstances that it was not “practicable” to notify the insurer until the lawsuit was served and overturned the denial of coverage for late notice.


Continue Reading Who Does an Insurance Broker Serve? Somebody!

data-security-concept478427617TSBusinesses have revolutionized the way they reach customers. Through computers, smart phones, iPads and a host of other technologies, we can now make purchasing decisions from the comfort of our homes. All we need to do is enter our personal information and our credit card data, and one click later that product magically appears at our doorstep, ready to be used.

But the convenience brought to us by the technological revolution comes with its vices. Our personal information is handed over to businesses, sometimes without our knowledge, and those businesses can then track our online activities, ranging from websites we frequent, to what products we purchase, to what we “mouse-over,” and a host of other things. They then store that information to one day use to their advantage in marketing efforts.

Continue Reading Surf’s Up: The Wave of High-profile Privacy Class Actions

477415065We are taught early on that we are each responsible for our own actions. If we make a mistake that results in damages to someone else, we have to pay for those damages. That is the basic concept of indemnification, and the law enforces it.

In many circumstances, a party to a contract wants to make sure that the other party agrees to indemnify them in the event of a claim or suit. Often, a service provider is required to supply insurance for the benefit of the service purchaser by adding the buyer to its policy. It has become more and more common for form contracts required by appraisal management companies (AMCs) to contain an indemnification or “hold harmless” clause. A professional service provider must take care in reviewing these contracts, understand them and be prepared to reject the business opportunity if it cannot negotiate the terms.

Continue Reading To Indemnify or Not to Indemnify? That Is the Question!